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Tag - Coca Cola

The Only Way to Make Money from Social Media

If I had a buck for every time I was asked “How can I make money from social media?” I wouldn’t have to write posts about making a buck from social media.
The problem is not with social media itself. No platform worth its cyber-salt ever claimed that you’d make millions by posting, uploading or liking social media content.
Oh, I know, I know. How about Oreos, Dell, Coca-Cola, Old Spice, Kim Kardashian etc you ask. And I’d answer “Yes, but…”.
All of those brands and the many others that are profiled in seemingly every social media presentation were major brands either before or separate to the influence of social media. That’s my point. Wrestling with the answer to the ROI from social media is like trying to quantify the ROI from your receptionist. Each has their undoubted benefits but being able to spend $1 on either with the certainty of getting $5 back is not one of them.
Neither can do you or your organisation any good in isolation. You need your other marketing initiatives in place for social media to be truly effective. By effective, that means integrating with those elements to deliver my favourite marketing equation of: 1 + 1 = 23.5.
So the only way to consistently make money from social media is for it to become a fundamental part of how you do business with the outside world.
What’s too often forgotten when any marketing investment is being reviewed is that success is not about doing one thing occasionally, it’s about doing a hundred little things consistently. There are few more visual, flexible, dynamic and interactive ways to do lots of little things than via social media.
The frustration of course is that it’s hard to highlight exactly what the financial return is from your social media investment. But try cutting social media altogether – or doing it poorly – and see how your increasingly discerning markets think of you; particularly compared to competitors that are active on social media.
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Images courtesy:

Just Add Happiness – Coca Cola Marketing

You’ve read posts like this one before – it’s about Coca Cola’s marketing campaigns and why they’re great. We love the way that the soft drink company has raised the standard for content marketing – not so much using content as a tool, but as a marketing strategy altogether. Recently we’ve had the pleasure to see a couple of new interesting campaigns, more often than not including the famously loved vending machine. Here’s a pick from Coca Cola’s momentous archives:

      The invisible vending machine (above); this vending machine was built into a wall and camouflaged. It would only become visible if a couple passed by, asking them their names (which would show up on the wall when told) and offer them a bottle of coke;
      The “hug me” vending machine; this one offered bottles of coke in exchange for hugs;
      The Christmas vending machine; the day before Christmas, this vending machine located in Argentina would open up a secret door when people put money into it. This would give them access to a snowy, Christmas decorated room housing Santa Claus;
       The happiness vending machine; these ones appeared at a number of locations and could as well be called the “gives-away-lots-and-lots-of-free-stuff” vending machine. People who interacted with the machine got free coke, surfboards, skateboards and pizza among other things, provided by the machines anonymous inhabitants;
       The dancing vending machine; this one had people dance for free coke;
       The transformer; this one wasn’t really a vending machine, but a person dressed as a transformer capable of turning into one (the ad was so great we didn’t want to leave it out!);

Some of you probably see a reoccurring theme in some of these videos; give away free stuff and people will love you. This is true to some extent, who doesn’t love free stuff? But Coca Cola does more than that. The people in these videos only expected a bottle of coke, but ended up enjoying something out of the ordinary instead.
Coca Cola makes the consumers in each campaign feel special (not EVERY machine out there will hurl free stuff at you), and the company get to use their reactions for some unique and compelling content. By making more of a happening out of these campaigns, they create an “I was there” kind of discourse, having people from Hong Kong to Argentina discussing the brand. This way, consumers come to look forward to the company’s next move.
We may all have different takes on Coca Cola, but you’ll have to admit that they have made their marketing into an art. “Happiness” is a keyword, showing that they know what advertising is all about. A great ad will leave that positive imprint and association – having you come back for more.
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs. 
Image & video courtesy: thedrum.com, Youtube; Coca Cola, Openhappinesskorea

On your marks…

How content marketers are gearing up for the London Olympics
The sporting extravaganza that is the Olympics is less than 100 days away. Anyone who knows the area of east London where the bulk of the activities will be taking place can testify to its transformation.
But it’s not only a rundown urban area that has been overhauled. Marketing strategies have been completely rethought as content marketers prepare for the ‘social media games’.
At the time of the last Olympics in Beijing in 2008, Facebook was four years old and had some 140 million users. Now, it has around 900 million. Twitter was even more nascent – a two-year-old toddler in 2008 with two million users, a confident schoolie in 2012 with 150 million.
With gains of 642 per cent a staggering 7500 per cent respectively, it’s fair to say the growth of Facebook and Twitter – and social media in general – has been nothing short of phenomenal. Which is why marketers are so keen to tap into it for the Olympic Games.
The social media advantage
A report from Reuters says that ‘advertisers hope that social media will do much of the heavy lifting in raising brand profiles, by getting consumers to chat online’.
‘It’s all about engagement,’ says Peter Applebaum, founder of social media marketing agency Tick Yes and content marketing agency Tick Content (publisher of The Message). ‘Content marketing through social media allows brands to interact with their consumers. By creating relationships they can generate conversations, create coverage and, in the end, increase sales.’
And as Mark Renshaw of US-based advertising agency Leo Burnett told Reuters: ‘[In 2008] online marketing then focused on building websites. Today, brands are building elaborate campaigns… designed to create a buzz on Facebook and other social media sites such as Pinterest and Twitter.’
Olympic social media content marketing strategies
According to Ralph Santana, Chief Marketing Officer at Samsung, Facebook ‘is where consumers are… If you can figure out how to build communities around your brand, it’s really powerful.’
Which is why Samsung has used Facebook to launch its ‘Olympic Genome Project’. Featuring a game called How Olympic Are You?, users are invited to establish their Olympic connections by, for example, finding athletes from their hometowns or athletes who like the same music/movies as them.
As Reuters reports: ‘It gathers the information by tying in to a user’s Facebook page. The game dangles prizes such as discounted electronics and a trip to the Olympics to keep consumers coming back; whenever consumers complete an activity, such as a quiz on Olympic trivia, they are invited to post results to their Facebook page.’
According to Santana, the result has already been a doubling of the amount of time users spend on the site (an average of eight minutes per visit) compared to the standard Samsung sites.
As ever, Coca-Cola is ahead of the game when it comes to content marketing through social media. Its Move to the Beat campaign is based on a song by DJ Mark Ronson and singer Katy B. Fans can collect beat fragments on Facebook and edit a version of the song for their own page.

It comes hot on the heels of the announcement that Coke has just forged a promotional partnership with online streaming service Spotify. Through it, the soft drinks giant will integrate Spotify on its Facebook pages in return for using Spotify to power its Coca-Cola Music program. A joint app is also said to be forthcoming.
Social media ‘drives us toward content that is able to provoke consumer conversation,’ said James Eadie, Olympic Portfolio Director for Coca-Cola. ‘That drives longevity.’
Money well spent
Reuters reports that ‘a comprehensive multimedia Olympic campaign might cost anywhere from $30 million to $50 million’, with digital outlets ‘attracting funds that might have gone to television in prior years’.
It’s a hefty pricetag, but brand executives claim it is well worth it because ‘they can weave tighter connections between their brands and target customers during the Olympics compared to other events.’
Proctor & Gamble is another company with a targeted Olympics social media campaign. Marc Pritchard, P&G’s Global Marketing and Brand Building Officer has clear goals for the campaign: ‘What we want to try to do is get a 10 per cent lift on our Facebook brand pages. That would be a lot quicker than we normally do.’
Pritchard knows from experience how successful an Olympics tie-in can be, saying that recalls of messages after the company’s Vancouver 2010 Olympics television campaign was 30 per cent more than for its regular campaigns.
And with social media powering the conversation, many of the world’s leading brands are betting that those statistics will be even more impressive post-London.
 
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.

Coke and content

Coca-Cola’s brilliant new content marketing strategy keeps it ahead of the game
The Message has long been a fan of how Coca-Cola markets itself across a variety of platforms. From film clips to Facebook, the soft-drinks giant clearly understands the importance of creating engaging content as not just a marketing tool, but a whole marketing strategy.
In fact, Coke takes content so seriously that it has recently released a new approach. Called ‘Content 2020’ it is essentially a manifesto highlighting how the company ‘will evolve its approach to the creative agenda on its key brands’.
The key point is that Coca-Cola plans to ‘move from creative excellence to content excellence… to create ideas so contagious they cannot be controlled’. Talk about an inspiring vision! Coke doesn’t just want to be part of the conversation, it doesn’t just want to sell products (although, obviously, that remains the goal), but it wants to do that by earning, in its own words, ‘a disproportionate share of pop culture’.
In other words, Coca-Cola wants to be up there with The Beatles, Jack Kerouac, Andy Warhol, Apple, Muhammad Ali, the PC, mobile phones, social media, Lady Gaga and everyone and everything else who/that has shaped and changed the way people think and live.
The plan is to start with brand stories that provoke conversations that Coca-Cola constantly acts on and reacts to. So why is it doing this? Because the paradigm has shifted – because content is changing, with user-generated content becoming more important as a result of social media and mobile content creating an ‘on demand culture’.
Coca-Cola acknowledges that it has looked at other brands and business models for ideas/inspiration about how to best create this greater engagement. But we’re betting it will end up being better than any of them. And as a template for creating a successful content marketing strategy for all businesses great and small, it takes some beating.
This video explains Coca-Cola’s ‘Content 2020’ strategy in detail. Although there won’t be a quiz at the end of it, it’s still not a bad idea to take notes…

The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.