Tick Yes Blog

Tag - digital

Twitter’s Grand Design

So Twitter has been quite active recently. It’s what’s to be expected from a network of Twitter’s calibre; as a recently listed company they have quietly introduced a new profile pagedesign to a limited amount of users (a complement to an earlier redesign). As one of the top ten biggest social networks, it was only a matter of time before the little blue bird would make it into the stock exchange, thus constant updates are to be considered a necessity.
 
The new design has however been far too familiar for some users, as it’s quite similar to updates as seen on Facebook and/or Google+. Changes include:

        A larger profile photo and a wider header photo;
        Tweets are no longer arranged vertically, but scattered in a way resembling a news feed;
        A design focusing a lot more on images and video in general;

One might wonder where this is heading. Becoming more image-oriented is one way of taking on competitors like Instagram (and owner Facebook) head on, while changes to the timeline could be a way of making it more compatible with sponsored tweets. Ultimately; these recent updates has made Twitter a significantly competitive communication platform for marketing.

At the time of writing, it’s not sure whether or not all changes will be applicable, but it gets you thinking about the future of social media (in terms of this becoming generic interface) and its impact on the user experience. Competing social networks are moving towards similar end results – they want to connect people, they want users to share quality content, they want ad revenue and they want to be the social network user’s preference over their competitors. Piece of cake?
There are similar problems solved with similar solutions. Twitter started out allowing # and @ in posts, Facebook then followed suit as it’s a great way of connecting users with one another (consumer and brands). If an image oriented interface gives Twitter the opportunity to compete with Instagram, then that might be just what they needed to enhance the network’s functionality. If a profile page design works more effectively than others, then why change a winning concept?
Video is currently receiving a double golden thumbs up award for being the best communication medium, predicted to make out 50% of the total online consumption in 2014 and 69% in 2017 (according to a Cisco study cited by The Guardian). This would have us expect social networks to adapt accordingly. Will this result in a number of social media platforms looking pretty much the same? And how will they evolve from there? Either they fall back on their respective niches, or they merge into some kind of super network. We can make great things happen if we collaborate, or is that being overly optimistic?
What we see is the evolution of social media – the survival of the fittest. In China, social network RenRen took a swing at competitor Kaixin by buying the kaixin.com URL and use it in quite an unethical way. You’d like to think that this is an exception, but in the future we could be watching the ultimate showdown of the social media networks – a dirty fight to the death. Because at the end of the day, users don’t really care about the company providing the service or product. They want solutions to THEIR problems, and the one who provides these solutions will be the last one standing.
Twitter’s updates may have it looking more like its bigger competitors, but this is all part of evolution. In the end, it’s not about who has the sharpest teeth, it’s about who produces the best ideas – the best results.
 
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Image courtesy: dribbble.com, crave.cnet.co.uk

How Digital is Changing the PR Landscape

“PR is persuasion” someone once said. “Persuasion” is a dangerous word in marketing; people don’t want to think of themselves as being persuaded into anything. The Public Relations Society of America has a definition of PR that, although more complex, is much better:

“Public Relations is a strategic communication process that builds mutually beneficial relationships between organizations and their publics.”

There you go! “Communication” is a much better word in marketing, and quite telling in the social media age of today. But what’s your take on PR? Do you think of hidden agendas and malicious scheming? Do old episodes of Spin City pop up in your head? This is probably because you, as a lot of people, have a more traditional view (or experience) of PR.
Public Relations is adapting to the new Web. Nowadays, companies aren’t the masters of their own information; consumers are well informed, they know that they have choices and they share information amongst themselves. This alone can create a huge public counter pole, capable of standing up against the biggest of organizations. When information is expected to be only a click away, those who do not offer that information aren’t even considered. Customers can, and will, move on.
Organizations are now being forced into providing total transparency. In an age when everyone is a potential publisher, hiding something will soon raise suspicion. Now this isn’t the end of PR, far from it. Social media has created huge opportunities for those who are prepared to work for it. Quality content deserves to be shared; the holy grail of going viral can make an organization (or individual) into a star overnight. This is where the role of PR comes into it.
Its purpose is not all focused towards JUST media relations, public events and spinning – with social media, PR experts can have the public doing most of the work for them; through creating a portal that pushes out user generated content (which could sincerely be the best thing since sliced bread).
So what about the PR people? After creating that viral snowball, what do they do? This is where it gets interesting; this is where we find the true change in PR. Far from all organizations have social media policies, and every now and then it shows. Social media is time consuming and hard to understand for some – this is why the men and women of PR still have a very important role to play. When everyone can be a media outlet, there is a need for skilled professionals who can coach, educate and encourage – create co-workers who can guide that snowball down the right track, use the digital tools at their disposal to empower and improve other marketing efforts. This is achieved simply by emphasising an edge, a differentiator, a word, an image or even a sound – and making it meaningful and unique so that it will grab people’s attention in the batter of an eyelid. This is where the role of PR is now being moulded around and how its functionality underneath the marketing umbrella has adapted to the digital environment we live in.
Education is key. In a society where the ‘sharing of information’ equals money, we need people with the skills and experience to handle it properly – as a way to build mutually beneficial relationships between organizations and their publics.
 
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Image courtesy: blog.commbank.com.au, mashable.com

What Kind of Digital User Are You?

Social media has indeed infiltrated quite a number of fields including the business industry. Apart from marketing and journalism, professionals from various fields have had to learn to adopt the social media culture or...