Tick Yes Blog

Tag - marketing

Telling the Truth and Other Insults

There are some insults you just can’t forget.
Soon after joining an agency some team members levelled criticism at me that still hurts 15+ years later: that I was too honest. Apparently telling the complete truth (is there any other type?) was a career limiting habit in agency land.
Fortunately, my apparent ‘aw shucks’ honesty has not held me back. That’s not to say that my peers were wrong. Perhaps I could have done that much better had I learned to embellish, gild the lily or been less intimate with the truth on occasion. Perhaps, but I don’t think so.
Truth in advertising and marketing remains a contentious subject. Apparently the broader population has mistrust for the people and vehicles that bring them images and messages designed to get them to do things. My biggest bugbear is with the notion that we professional communicators can cajole and fool people into buying things they don’t want or need.
I actually think that the truth is pretty compelling. Our job is to illustrate and illuminate that truth.
Perhaps it’s politically incorrect to say this but if people are so easily duped into doing something that they don’t want to do, more fool them. Marketers and advertisers don’t have some magic dust that lures people into commercial slavery. Of course our job is to highlight the benefits the products and services we’re promoting have to offer you the customer. And then we need to emotionally engage. That’s it. That’s our supposedly insidious strategy exposed.
If you don’t want the rice cooker, don’t buy it. It really is up to you, not me.
 
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Image courtesy: www.americasvoice.com

The Super Marketing Opportunity

Forget Point Piper, Toorak, New Farm and Peppermint Grove. The most expensive real estate in Australia is just down the road from where you live. Per square metre, the humble shelf in your local supermarket is worth infinitely more than any property the so-called ritzy suburbs have to offer.
Why? Supermarkets have done a fabulous job of marketing themselves and being accessible to consumers. Millions walk through the doors of Coles and Woolworths every week to buy tens of millions of products from their shelves. Such is the enormity of their success that general / trade publications, newsletters and websites eagerly report on the supermarkets’ every media release, staff change and initiative.
Then there’s the fact that annual grocery sales in Australia top $100 billion accounting for 29% of overall retail turnover. And to top it off, supermarkets consistently feature in Australia’s top advertising spenders lists. Clearly, supermarkets matter. But why do they have to matter so much? Particularly when it comes to their supply partners struggling to get noticed on their crowded shelves.
In this age of global disintermediation, the grocery business model is one of the few that has not changed for decades. On any day dozens of nervous FMCG account managers head off to Hawthorn East and Bella Vista with their fancy brand presenters and planograms hoping to influence their Coles and Woolworths category buyers. Fail to impress that handful of people and your brand could end up delisted and dead in the water.
All because supermarkets ‘own’ their customers and the grocery brand marketers don’t. This is lunacy. And there’s no greater proof of that, for brand marketers at least, than the relentless growth of the supermarkets’ own premium housebrands. Having driven their suppliers to collectively invest billions of dollars building consumer demand for pasta, soft drinks and breakfast cereal etc. supermarkets are in the process of successfully re-directing that demand to their own brands.
Yes, housebrand/generics have been around for years but traditionally they occupied the cut-price, lower quality end of the market. Brands are now being forced off the shelves by cheaper alternatives of equal or even greater quality that are owned by their supposed retail partners. Clearly, it pays to own the customer. Nielsen predicts that house brands will make up 40% of grocery sales within four years; in the UK, they already make up 50%.  So how can brand marketers halt their shrinking shelf visibility and market share? The solution is so simple and so cost-effective that it’s astounding that grocery marketers are not implementing it en masse.
Put simply, grocery marketers need to leverage digital platforms to turn their consumers into brand zealots with a vision of relegating supermarkets to transactional distribution centres. Now before you dismiss this as a pie in the sky, completely unrealistic idea, consider how many people care what company is selling the tickets when they’re lining up overnight to see Bruce Springsteen, One Direction or the AFL Grand Final? None. Those attractions are so desirable and so invested with their own unique emotional drivers that everything else is just logistics. Bruce Springsteen owns his customers, not Ticketek.
OK, consumers are not likely to spend hours waiting in line to buy your brand of tomato sauce. But if your brand can in some way deliver on your consumers’ interests, needs and desires there’s a good chance that you won’t be lumped in with every sauce brand / housebrand. Create relevance and connection by giving consumers what they want and they will enter your competitions, give you their email address, comment on your Facebook page and watch your YouTube videos. And if you continue to emotionally engage them with interesting, informative and fun content on these and other platforms maybe, just maybe they’ll choose your sauce over the cheaper alternatives.
Consumers default to price when they’re given no other meaningful reason to pay a premium. There are many far cheaper entertainment alternatives to a Bruce Springsteen concert but there’s only one ‘Boss’ so seeing him is worth the premium for his fans. Of course not every consumer will be interested in such an approach. Many will choose the cheapest. But if higher priced brands weren’t relevant there would only be housebrands and generics.

The mistake most FMCG brand marketers are making is that they don’t understand the far-reaching benefits of creating individual consumer relationships as opposed to what they and their agencies are used to: six week ad campaigns. Traditional advertising used to be the glue that built and bound consumer emotions to your brand and drove sales. That’s still true to a degree. But that degree is shrinking in direct proportion to the consumption of traditional media. Are you watching TV, listening to the radio or reading newspapers and magazines more than you were five years ago? You’re not alone.
FMCG brand owners need to have a strategic consumer relationship vision instead of just a tactical promotional plan. You now have the tools to engage and nurture consumers well beyond the next gondola end promotion or two week price cut. Yes, tactics are critical, particularly when you need to deliver results in the next month/quarter. The challenge arises when your brand lurches from one tactical implementation to the next with no longer term consumer engagement strategy. Consumers aren’t stupid; you and your retailers have educated them to buy whatever brand (for those who still buy brands) is on special.
Thanks to digital and social platforms, consumers are more accessible to marketers than ever before. And they are willing to get involved with your brand; they just need good reasons to do so. Then there’s the icing on the cake: you get so much more for your digital marketing dollars than you do with traditional ad budgets. What would barely cover the production of a typical 30 second TVC, could power a highly effective digital customer engagement program for a year. Plus, at the end of that 12 months you could have built up substantial databases and other owned digital assets that you can leverage for years to come. Something traditional brand advertising has never done.
Many tangible commercial returns can be delivered for the FMCG marketers who build direct consumer relationships. The days of allowing others to own your consumers are over. You have the tools, you have the strategies. What you don’t have is a good reason to do nothing about it.
 
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Images Courtesy: www.omnlondon.com, www.npr.org

What’s in a Social Media Policy?

Almost everything you post online is open for public viewing. This should come as no surprise but you wouldn’t believe how often a lack of common sense is the culprit in social media mishaps. Yes, there are numerous examples we could provide: People posting (what many of us would call inappropriately) silly videos of themselves on YouTube or tweets that were meant to be funny but took to Mama Mia’s leading story within minutes. Then there’s the occasional picture meant for a partner that in some way managed to reach the entire Instagram public. What people do in their free time is their business, but what if they are doing it whilst representing your business? The obvious solution is to ban social media, but as it turns out, it’s also a very bad idea (unless you’re going for a reign of terror, and employees will just find a way anyway).
What you need is a social media policy.
Ah, yes, one of those policy thingies. If it’s well put together, it could save you a lot of embarrassment whilst getting your brand out of harm’s way. But this goes beyond risk management; there are clear benefits in allowing, and encouraging, your employees to update their social media accounts at work (in moderation of course). As experts on most things related to your business they are ideal brand advocates, and all come with their own networks of potential customers.  Your employees are your extra marketing team, customer service team and in house support team. Allow them the opportunity to communicate amongst themselves and with the rest of the world and they will help your business grow. They do however need guidelines.
A social media policy should do two things; provide guidelines to the employees, preventing them from causing or getting into trouble and inform them of the disciplinary actions that will be taken if they do. You could of course Google another company’s policy and use that as a template, but the document will be that much more effective if it’s customised to your particular field with your employee’s particular positions in mind. Ask yourself these three questions;

        What’s the worst that could happen if employees are allowed access to social media?
        How does my social media policy prevent this worst case scenario?
        How would it have employees respond to it if it happened?

Be clear and concise in your policy. “Be professional in what you say on your social media profile” is a good start, however when not put into context this alone leaves a little too much for self interpretation (note, don’t be too precise either, or you’ll risk drowning the message in definitions). It should all be based on common sense; the policy should be a supportive document, not a hindrance. It won’t do you or your company any good if it diminishes social media efficiency.
So, what can be found in a valuable social media policy?

        A paragraph on who the document applies to – are freelancers and employees working from home included?
        Guidelines on what employees shouldn’t do online (what information to disclose, what not to share, what sites not to visit etc);
        Guidelines on what employees CAN do (encourage creative behaviour that indirectly hints at your amazing corporate culture);
        Information on disciplinary measures;
        An educating section on online behaviour, just in case;

The positive effect your employees’ online presence can have on your business is too good to pass up. Make sure to educate employees in the potential dangers of online activity and about sharing information too generously. Present them with so called “Cosmic Law”, coined by Jay Shepherd; always assume that the one you least want to see your post will in fact see it. With this in mind let your people get out there and endorse your brand to help it grow.
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Image courtesy: thesocialworkplace.com, socialnewsdaily.com

General Pants + Tinder = Strategic Partnership

If marketing was easy, then every business would be a success (theoretically speaking). Of course it isn’t easy and businesses spend hours upon hours developing marketing strategies to clearly communicate what they actually want to say. Content creation, budgets and social media updates can be time consuming and if you’re unlucky (or get it wrong), sadly unsuccessful. But what if you could be offered a well deserved break? What if someone else could help you lift that heavy load of online marketing? Enter a strategic partnership in the form of a fashion retailer combined with a digital dating app (which go together like a horse and carriage don’t you think?)
General Pants hooked up with the flirting app Tinder around Valentine’s Day this year, offering users the opportunity to send a push mobile notification inviting other users to “get in my pants”. Tinder users could show their profile in a General Pants store to get 20% off their next purchase. Everybody wins – users get a Tinder experience plus 20% off pants, all at a lower cost than the usual marketing campaign.
Tinder has been busy getting it on with other brands in the form of strategic partnerships. The app helped promote the TV-show ‘Suits’ as well as ‘The Mindy Project’. Characters in the shows would discuss Tinder while Tinder would display the same characters within the app. This is perhaps as subtle as eating a giant Mars bar on live television, but at least in the case of ‘The Mindy Project’, the Tinder appearances kind of make sense as the show has a romantic focus.
It would be impossible to write a post about strategic partnership without mentioning the almost legendary alliances involving Ron Burgundy, the scotch loving main character in the Anchorman movies, played by Will Ferrell. The most famous was Burgundy’s promotion of the Dodge Durango via 70 YouTube videos, or perhaps we should say “promotion”, as Ron (or Will Ferrel as himself for that matter) wouldn’t always speak well of the car at all. It was a huge success (apparently sales went up 59%) that cost Dodge close to nothing, as the movie makers payed for the videos in order to promote Anchorman 2. A less well known partnership hosted by the man with the mustache included a limited edition Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. The flavour? Well… scotchy scotch scotch of course!
Strategic partnerships are a smart form of marketing – as long as they provide customers with sufficient value and grow the businesses at a low cost for all parties involved. A bit of logic does help, don’t put a giraffe on a skateboard unless it makes sense in some way. Consumers are becoming more skeptical when they see brands working together and collaboration without some kind of common ground will only create uneasiness (which a clever enough marketing team could no doubt use to its advantage). Don’t overdo it – people eventually get tired of Ron Burgundy and those Tinder related dialogues becoming a little too obvious at some point. We’re talking collaboration, not necessarily a merger, so don’t rely too heavily on others to pull your brand.
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Image courtesy: pixelworld.deviantart.com, examiner.com, nolandalla.com, abine.com

Just Add Happiness – Coca Cola Marketing

You’ve read posts like this one before – it’s about Coca Cola’s marketing campaigns and why they’re great. We love the way that the soft drink company has raised the standard for content marketing – not so much using content as a tool, but as a marketing strategy altogether. Recently we’ve had the pleasure to see a couple of new interesting campaigns, more often than not including the famously loved vending machine. Here’s a pick from Coca Cola’s momentous archives:

      The invisible vending machine (above); this vending machine was built into a wall and camouflaged. It would only become visible if a couple passed by, asking them their names (which would show up on the wall when told) and offer them a bottle of coke;
      The “hug me” vending machine; this one offered bottles of coke in exchange for hugs;
      The Christmas vending machine; the day before Christmas, this vending machine located in Argentina would open up a secret door when people put money into it. This would give them access to a snowy, Christmas decorated room housing Santa Claus;
       The happiness vending machine; these ones appeared at a number of locations and could as well be called the “gives-away-lots-and-lots-of-free-stuff” vending machine. People who interacted with the machine got free coke, surfboards, skateboards and pizza among other things, provided by the machines anonymous inhabitants;
       The dancing vending machine; this one had people dance for free coke;
       The transformer; this one wasn’t really a vending machine, but a person dressed as a transformer capable of turning into one (the ad was so great we didn’t want to leave it out!);

Some of you probably see a reoccurring theme in some of these videos; give away free stuff and people will love you. This is true to some extent, who doesn’t love free stuff? But Coca Cola does more than that. The people in these videos only expected a bottle of coke, but ended up enjoying something out of the ordinary instead.
Coca Cola makes the consumers in each campaign feel special (not EVERY machine out there will hurl free stuff at you), and the company get to use their reactions for some unique and compelling content. By making more of a happening out of these campaigns, they create an “I was there” kind of discourse, having people from Hong Kong to Argentina discussing the brand. This way, consumers come to look forward to the company’s next move.
We may all have different takes on Coca Cola, but you’ll have to admit that they have made their marketing into an art. “Happiness” is a keyword, showing that they know what advertising is all about. A great ad will leave that positive imprint and association – having you come back for more.
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs. 
Image & video courtesy: thedrum.com, Youtube; Coca Cola, Openhappinesskorea

Keep it Simple Part 1 – A Customer’s Perspective

Remember when the decision making process was less complex? Maybe it never was, but isn’t it a little trickier nowadays, you know, with this global network called the “Internet”, presenting all possible options plus one extra? Back in the old days when there were two brands of shampoo to choose from, one for men and the other one for women – shopping was bliss. Now there are thousands, and by the gift of the Internet, customers have instant knowledge access to most probably all of them.
You’ve all heard the expression “information overload”; it’s one of the hazards of the digital age. This is not just something that critics of modern society made up to scare kids away from the computer and into the playground. Studies show that humans in fact do have limited information processing abilities. With too much information entering our brain, our ability to make good decisions is notably hindered.
Variety is great however. Customers are more in control – they’re well informed and have the ability to pick the best option from a wide selection of products and services. This indirectly benefits the companies due to customers disregarding the less honest brands. It’s more likely therefore that the last man is the one who actually knows what he’s talking about and how best to ‘walk the talk’.
Back in the days when there were only a couple of brands to choose from, there was less pressure for companies to spend endless hours creating a marketing campaign that cost more than Victoria Beckham’s wardrobe. On the plus side however, diversity has created a more caring society where customers really matter.
Moving on – diversity may be a good thing, but that doesn’t make it easier for people to choose what shampoo to buy, quite the opposite really. Or forget about shampoo, how about which university to go to, what stock to invest in, where to cut ones hair? Some decisions, if made incorrectly, could mean utter disaster (or at least major inconvenience and a bad hair do). So how do we make good decisions in a world filled with information?
There are two different kinds of decision makers that you need to know about; maximisers and satisficers. A maximiser will make sure that he or she has considered every single option before making a decision. A satisficer will however settle for the first option that fits the bill/need. One may assume that being a maximiser is the way to go, but according to Psychology Today, maximisers tend to be less satisfied with their decision. The downside of knowing all of your options is that you also know what you’re giving up. So maybe the maximiser tactic should be saved for those super important decisions (and not which shampoo to buy).
So if your customers are struggling with indecision, chances are that they’re using one of the following strategies to make up their minds – they could for example:

      Divide the options into different aspect categories (this shampoo smells good, this one is cheap, this one is eco friendly), then pick the best choice from each category and narrow down the preferences until only one item remains;
       Consider two products at a time. The winner of each “round” will face the next opponent until no more opponents remain;
       Find the worst alternative and throw it out – then keep at it until the best option remains;
       Simply go for a brand they recognise.  For the customer, selecting what they know may not be the best alternative on this list, but it works really well for making quick decisions. This is why it’s so important to create brand awareness among consumers (as discussed here).

Having too much information can be just as frustrating as a lack of it, plus few customers can handle the wrecking ball of information being launched at them every day (excuse the Miley Cyrism). Knowing that customers have limits and are forced to use different strategies to cope with what indecision gives you, Mr Marketer, an understanding of why you need to keep your marketing strategy as simple and clear as possible to cut through the clutter.
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Image courtesy: magneticresume.com, indezign.net

To that Special Someone… your Customers?

It’s that time of the year again; heaps of hearts, holding hands and hugs. It’s Valentine’s Day. Even though it’s one of those holidays that may catch some of us by surprise, as it’s not a public holiday in most parts of the world, it’s still something to look forward to, an excuse to spend some one-on-one quality time with that special someone. And time is not all that we spend. A CNN study performed in the U.S. shows that the average person is willing to spend close to $130 on this day of love – $18.6 billion being the estimated total amount. It’s no secret that Valentine’s Day is equally treasured by lovers and marketers alike. People love other people, but people also love brands – you’ll want your brand to be the lovable kind. So how do you do that? After changing your Facebook cover photo into something more lovey-dovey, you can start reshaping your product into hearts. Easy if you sell muffins, more of a challenge if you’re into banking. Let’s have a look at what has worked out well in the past;

        The on-demand car service company UBER made it possible for you to deliver flowers to your loved one through their app. This turned out to be a win-win situation; the company already had their drivers on the road and the concept was a life-saver for absent minded boy or girlfriends;
        Heineken made a Facebook app that made it possible to send a personalised serenade to your could-be partner;
        Starbucks “Cup Magic” campaign let customers who had downloaded their app see heart shaped petals whirl from heart-clad Starbucks mugs via their smartphone.

Too much work creating an app? There are other, less specific things you can do – how about;

        User generated content: The greeting card service Scribbler asked their audience to define what love meant to them. All they had to do was answer three questions and then hopefully become the winner of a new Ipad;
        Go mobile: Studies show that 4 out of 10 shoppers will use their smartphone to buy gifts. Having a smartphone responsive website and being extra active on social media platforms like Twitter and Instagram is probably a good idea;
        Think like a couple: This is the day when couples go out and do things together. If you sell cupcakes, offer them in twos – remember that whatever your product or service; Valentine’s Day is about being one of two or becoming one of two;
        Target men: Chivalry isn’t dead. According to studies, men are more likely to spend more money on Valentine’s Day gifts;
        Give your customers a break: Not all companies target couples. Singles may get sick of hearts and chocolate, so offering a Valentine’s Day free zone could be a good idea.

Whatever you choose to do, it should be something a little out of the ordinary. However, the ordinary should include knowing your customers and caring for them – every other day of the year. But DO offer a cherry on top of that heart shaped muffin this Valentine’s Day.
 
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Image courtesy: Pinterest, techblogstop.com

Social Media Trends for Big Business

 
Social media has started to make a big impact on the economy. While social media was once considered to be just a place to connect with people, it soon expanded and now encompasses the economy of the world. Once the global reach of social media was realised, it was only a matter of time before businesses started to utilise social media in a big way.
 
In a very short time, social media has become an integral part of most businesses enabling some to double their revenue over the past few years. Many big businesses seem to favor a few social media practices that have become very popular among other smaller businesses too. Based on popular social media trends, these big businesses utilise them in the following ways:
1. Implementing Marketing Basics in Social Media
Many people believe social media marketing is something pretty simple. All you do is sit at your desk and post stuff. That’s a fine excuse for using Facebook at work all the time!  However, big businesses take their social media as seriously as their marketing. With the help of market research, they take the time to analyse, strategise and produce content that is targeted to capture their audience yet simple to share on social media platforms.
2. Planning the Structure
More and more websites are becoming like social media platforms. While they don’t let you hang around and chat with your friends and family, these websites do showcase easy to navigate features, graphics and even colour combinations that entice you to spend more time on that page. With such pleasing aspects, websites have begun to morph more with social media websites and web pages.
3. Optimising the Structure
Technology has advanced nowadays to include devices like laptops, tablets and smart phones that can easily support internet connections. With the smaller and stronger processors available nowadays, tablets and smart phones function almost like a pocket computer. However, it is now almost a necessity to have various versions of it available in order to make it easier to view on the device your customer is  using. Having mobile friendly websites increase the chances of the user coming back to your mobile site by almost 74%.
4. Building Digital Foot Prints
Many people think all they need to do is add in the right SEO and they’re done. But many businesses, especially big businesses, create digital footprints for their social media and business. It’s pretty simple –  link all your social media websites with your business website and maintain the chain you’ve created. This makes it more likely that your business will appear on all search engines, whether it was YouTube, Facebook, Instagram or Twitter that led them to your business profile.
5. Crisp Content
Nowadays, people are so overloaded with information and so visually enticed that they don’t always have the time or the patience to read through it all. Keep it short, keep it simple and to the point yet be able to impart all that you want to share. It sounds a lot harder than you might think but once you get the hang of it, nothing is simper.
 
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Image Courtesy of Shutterstock
 

Instagram Joins the Video-posting Trend

What do you call today’s generation? Generation X? Y? Gen Z? The generation of total narcism? The “Me” generation? While there may be some debate as to what this generation should be called, one thing is for sure – it will be something that hints on how self-consumed today’s youth are.
 
Not to put the young ones down ‘cause they may still be the future of “yesterday’s dream”, but it’s almost a no brainer that today’s youth love themselves… a little too much. Just think of everything that social media has been producing. Think of all the “selfies”, the tweets about what they’re eating, Facebook posts about what they’re doing – everything is all about them.
However, as to how and why we should address this issue is a whole different topic. One thing is for sure, this attitude of the youth is a great social media marketing opportunity.
There’s a range of social media platforms for your brand to take advantage of, and one of the newest additions to that is Instagram video.
Yes, you heard that right! The phenomenal image sharing website now allows its users to post short video clips.
“Some moments, however, need more than a static image to come to life. Until now these stories have been missing from Instagram,” Instagram wrote on its official blog. “Today, we’re thrilled to introduce Video on Instagram and bring you another way to share your stories.”
Now that you know can optimise the use of this new feature to best of your brand, here are a few things you should learn about this new communication platform:
•    You can only post short clips.  If you’re planning to post a movie’s length of video, Youtube is your best bet. But if you just want to capture a short but meaningful clip, Instagram can help your customer engagement.
“We’re excited to see what the community will bring to video, whether it’s your local cafe showing you how they made your latte this morning or an Instagrammer on the other side of the world taking you on a tour of their city, a mother sharing her joys in parenting as her children laugh and play or your favorite athlete taking you behind the scenes,” Instagram noted on its blog.
-    Video filters are also available. Instagram has been a constant part of the any site’s “Best Photo Editing App” list. Since its release in 2010, it has been known for its image filters that help make any boring photo look awesome. Now, it brings this feature to its video-sharing feature as well.
“You’ll also find that we’ve added thirteen filters built specifically for video so you can keep sharing beautiful content on Instagram. When you post a video, you’ll also be able to select your favorite scene from what you’ve recorded as your cover image, so your videos are beautiful even when they’re not playing.”
-    It offers a unique “Cinema Feature”.  Apple users will enjoy an exclusive Instagram Video feature that allows video stabilization.
“If you’re taking videos on the go, you might find that they’re a little shaky. For iPhone 4S and iPhone 5, we’ve built a Cinema feature that lets you stabilize your video after you take it.”
 
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.

Why to Invest More on SEO

The age of social media continues to flourish as the different sectors in society take part in this growing network. From what used to be a simple online platform for families and friends to connect, it has grown to become an industry on its own.
 
Aside from the greater population of mere mortals who use social networking—students, regular employees, parents, junkies and the homeless—both the politics and the business sectors have also adopted the trend. Notably, even schools and the church have taken part in this movement. Now, you can simply follow the Pope and Barrack Obama on Twitter, or be friends with Harvard University and Nike on Facebook.
“You Rock, Barack!” can now be sent straight to the president of the United States, thanks to social networking.
It has also been proven that social media marketing has been very effective not only with businesses and brands, but also with campaigns, movements and even fund raising. As a matter of fact, it’s almost unbelievable how a simple Facebook page or a Twitition can reach so many people, raise millions and make dreams come true. Notably, online ads have also been very effective in boosting brand presence, familiarity and in the long run, revenue.
Facebook Marketing
Advertising through social networking sites like Facebook have been widespread since the site allowed ads. According to International Venture Capital Post, marketing through the site is one of the easiest ways to reach millions of potential customers and clients. Facebook also notes that over one billion people like and comment on an average of 3.2 billion times a day. With these figures, it is almost important for brands—especially with Facebook’s diverse demographic—to have a strong presence on the site.
Notably, with the social networking site’s new “hashtag” feature, your brand will be able to stir public conversation that can help point back to your brand or service. With the help of a social media agency, such services can be used fully to the best of your business.
SEO and You
The International Venture Capital Post also noted that more and more businesses have been using SEO to help bring the limelight on their brands. A report by Econsultancy and Netbooster reveals that a great number of UK companies spend 18% of their marketing budgets on search engine optimization.
While there are a number of reasons why you should also consider using this service, one simple reason would be that it does the dirty work for…well, at least the hard work. In a nutshell, SEO helps your brand pop-up on searches related to your business. With billions of people using Google, Yahoo!, Bing and other search engines every day, it’s almost stupid not to include this service in your digital marketing strategy and just pass up the opportunity for your brand to be seen by billions online.
 
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.