Tick Yes Blog

Tag - relationship marketing

Don’t Forget to Pat the Dog

A few days ago I posted an article called The Stupidity of Silence where I suggested that ceasing all contact when someone doesn’t give you what you want is a really dumb strategy.
Here’s another one.
We’re looking to sell our house at the moment. Part of the process is interviewing real estate agents. Theirs is an incredibly competitive business where all they’re offering is reputation and the perceived ability to persuade people to buy.
The first agent who came to our home said all the right things, had all the requisite collateral detailing sales successes etc. and was a nice guy. The only problem was that he completely ignored the adored family dog.
It’s a small point, I know. You could say that his job is to negotiate hard and to sell real estate on our behalf, not to get all cutesy with every pampered pooch that may slobber on his expensive suit.

But you could also say that his job is to effectively engage people and a simple short-cut to doing that is to understand what their emotional hot buttons are. It’s not much of a stretch to assume that a spoiled pet fits the hot button bill for the person – the property’s owner – the agent is trying to influence.
Not surprisingly, that agent didn’t get the business. The agent that did pat Mocha closed the sale.

For those of us who need to emotionally engage and influence people for a living, it’s easy to forget that little things to us may be major things to our market/s. Recognising what that is (by research, experience or assumption) and reacting accordingly can make the difference between success and failure.
 
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The Stupidity of Silence

For my sins, I’ve been brought up to say “please” and “thank you” and even, heaven forbid, open the door for ladies. I know that such behaviour is archaic, uncool and totally unexpected in today’s ‘every man for himself’ age, but it works for me.
That’s not to say that all people don’t appreciate manners. Take me, for example. Not surprisingly, I love it when people are polite. Mainly because it shows that they actually give a damn about our interaction.
That’s why it always astounds me when people in business don’t follow-up with a simple thank you email or even a note – when was the last time you received a handwritten thank you note? – after we’ve had some type of interaction.
This is particularly the case when someone has unsuccessfully asked for a meeting, a job or a sale. Most of the time, if I say “no thank you” I get nothing back. Silence. They’ve moved on to new prospects because I didn’t give them what they wanted.
How stupid. As the old sales expression goes ‘No doesn’t mean no, it just means not now.’
For the cost of spending 2 minutes writing a “Thanks, sorry we couldn’t do a deal this time. Maybe we can work together in the future…” email, their last impression with me would have been a positive one. Instead, their silence showed me that the decision not to work with them was probably the right one.
We’re all in sales, so rejection comes with the territory. You have to look beyond today’s no and focus on the long-term relationship you can form with the person who has just rejected what you’re offering. It’s important to remember that they didn’t reject you, they rejected what you were selling.
Some of the best clients I’ve ever worked with said no for several years until the time was right for them to say yes. The only person who misses out if you don’t keep in touch with the person who just said “thanks but no thanks” is you.

Keep in touch. Keep showing up. Show you care. It’s the smart thing to do.
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes Ė providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.

Why Email Marketing Runs Rings Around Social Media

Just like the fashion trends, marketers tend to change their mind about email marketing, particularly when itís compared to social media.
Itís a case of: RIP email marketing. Wait, itís alive! No, itís actually dead. Hold your horses, it is ALIVE! Whatís going on?
As a team that works with email marketing every day, we believe quality engagement and sales leads can still be generated through email. As long as itís done well, of course.
I know what youíre thinking, how dare I turn my nose up at social media; itís the way of the future, itís going to solve world hunger and have your babies! It will wake you up with a skinny latte every morning.
Donít get me wrong; social media can be an important part of your marketing if it makes sense for your business. But donít put it ahead of email marketing.
Whereís the Proof?
You want evidence that email marketing is the digital performance king? Here are a few figures:

Email marketing acquired 40 times more customers than Facebook and Twitter combined (McKinsey).
72% people prefer to receive promotional content through email, compared to 17% who prefer social media (Marketing Sherpa).
Email marketing drives more conversions than any other marketing channel, including search and social (Monetate).
For every $1 spent, email marketing generates $38 in ROI (Campaign Monitor).

More Numbers
Picture a full cup of rice as the number of emails sent out every day. In comparison, daily posts on Facebook and Twitter would be just ten miserable grains. Thatís because email has almost three times as many user accounts than all social media channels combined (MailMunch). Thatís 2.9 billion emails all up.
In the same breath, every single web search made on every search engine every single day is just 1/100th of daily email traffic.
Too many marketers are too busy chasing the latest Google algorithms and keyword magic bullets that theyíve neglected their email marketing strategy.
Quality Over Quantity
Youíve now seen emailís reach and the amount of traffic it has compared to social media platforms. If youíre thinking traffic doesnít mean much and a small quantity of well-targeted marketing aimed at quality traffic will nail larger amounts than a couple of hundred shotgun pellets sprayed at random; youíre right. That is precisely why email trumps social media for quality and quantity.
MailMunch compared the performance of email and social media marketing in an interesting way. Letís assume you have 2,000 people on an email database, 2,000 Facebook fans and 2,000 followers on Twitter. Based on industry averages, this is the exposure/engagement your target market would have with your messages:

435 people will open your email
120 of your Facebook fans will see your update
40 Twitter followers will see your tweet

But it gets worse. Here are the average click rates by channel:

Email marketing: 3.57%
Facebook: 0.07%
Twitter: 0.03%

Email is Personal
You thought Facebook was the most personal medium? Think again.
First, consider the above stats and comparisons. Second, the majority of people donít go to Facebook for 1-on-1 online conversations; they open their emails.
The inbox is like the Holy Grail Ė people guard it highly and once someone allows you access it means that theyíre interested in you or your offering on some level.
Email Gets More Attention Per Customer
You are more likely to get face-time with your leads if you use email, not because theyíre hanging around their inboxes more than their Facebook pages or searching Google, but because email makes room for repeated contact.
In fact, itís ‘invasive’ contact. Itís right in their mailbox, and thatís very different from posting a status update or tweeting which can get lost in the tsunami of online content.
Provided your content is worth reading, your customers and prospects are more likely to take a minute to open that email.
Email is a Transactional Medium
People expect to receive offers in their inbox, so their tolerance levels are a little higher than on social media where they just want to be, well, social.
Through email, you can train customers to expect offers from you while imparting value and positioning yourself as a thought leader. In turn, customers will start to look forward to receiving your emails.
And since you can make unlimited contact with them over time, you are significantly more likely to catch them when they are ready to buy.
Image Source: Shutterstock

Digital Marketing Lessons To Be Learnt From Donald Trump

Donald Trump teaching you marketing lessons? Seriously? Yes, seriously.
Love him or hate him, Donald Trump has made the race for the White House fascinating. And fascinating doesnít happen by chance.
Exceptional marketing combined with good old fashioned, in-your-face salesmanship are central to the success of his campaign – so far.
So putting aside your opinion on his politics, letís look at what can be learned from Trumpís ĎMaking America Great Againí campaign.

Know Your Audience
Contrary to the opinion of many, Trump is no fool and knows his audience incredibly well. He has identified the pain and passion points of his supporters and has moulded his campaign accordingly.
As a digital marketer, this should be the first thing you do when devising a strategy. You need to know who youíre targeting, how to address their needs with valuable content and then get them to take action.
Yes, it sounds obvious but itís astounding how many digital campaigns donít have any compelling customer reasons for being.

Engage Your Audience at Every Touchpoint
Trump is particularly well-known for his power to motivate, outrage, and entertain his audience on Twitter but itís not the only platform that his campaign uses.
Todayís campaigners are connected through multiple digital channels and are faced with an array of methods to reach out to their voters. This brings opportunity and challenges in equal measure. Get your contentís message, tone, and platform right, and youíll win loyal supporters. Get it wrong, and your audience clicks over to the next hot thing.
Engaging with your audience through relevant social media platforms is important. While Facebook will always take a leading role, this yearís election campaign has seen candidates reaching beyond the social giant to more niche platforms like Instagram and Snapchat.

Zig when Everyone Else Zags
From suggesting he paid Hillary to attend his wedding to the claim that Ted Cruzís father was involved with JFKís assassination, Trump marches to his own beat.
He does the opposite of what other politicians have been taught to do, but clearly itís working.
Hillary Clinton says that all is wonderful with the USA; Trump says the complete opposite. By graphically highlighting the countryís problems real or supposed he offers the ultimate solution: him. America will only be great again if you vote for Trump.
The takeaway here is to take chances. Do something different. When everyone is focusing on eBooks and blogs, create a podcast or set up a Periscope account. When everyone goes horizontal, go vertical.

Want to Stay in the Game? Donít Be Boring!
How many times have you listened to Hillary Clinton, Jeb Bush or Ted Cruz? Do you remember a single thing they said or tweeted? I canít either.
So how about The Donald?
Like most of us, I can easily rattle off any number of quotes, tweets and incidents from his campaign. Many of Trumpís tweets have taken on a life of their own, garnering enormous global coverage.
What does this tell you about his marketing?
Right from the outset, Trump has been outrageous, disrespectful, rude, controversial and, without fail, utterly compelling.
While his opponents were trying to cut through by spending many millions of dollars on advertising, Trumpís messages and style have earned him more free publicity and media time than all of his erstwhile Republican opponents: combined.
In the marketing world, Trumpís content stands head and shoulders above his competitors and makes people take notice. As a marketer, if you market the same old boring content everyone else is putting out there, no oneís going to see it or care.
From a content marketing perspective, be like Donald, not Jeb.

Build Rapport with Everyone, Even the Haters
This is a risky way to approach a digital marketing campaign but if your brand is ready to take a little heat, you can even get value from your haters.
Of course, while most of us donít want to ďfeed the trolls,Ē Trump has a knack for beating his detractors
to the punch. When Ted Cruz didnít endorse Trump on day three of the RNC, Trump was quick to tweet about it and turned a negative into a positive. Brave and smart.

Manage Your Brand or Domain
You may have heard about Trump redirecting Jeb Bushís website to his own. Due to poor brand management, Bushís team forgot to renew payment for their domain which meant that the address became available to anyone else. Trumpís team grabbed the opportunity and automatically redirected all visitors to his website.
Lesson: donít be a digital dill. Make sure your domain payments are up-to-date or outsource management to someone who knows what the hell theyíre doing!

Lessons Learnt
Trump understands just how dramatically digital communication has changed the way we engage and has invested in his online presence. He has more than 23 million social media followers / likes, dramatically more than any his competitors for the Republican nomination. And 50% more than Hillary Clinton.
Like any successful digital marketer, Trump maintains an active presence and regularly tweets, posts and interacts with both friends and foes alike. He also stays abreast of the latest digital trends (he announced his intention to run on Periscope).
Offensive, buffoonish or smart? Whatever you feel about the man, there’s no denying his masterful use of digital marketing. There a thing or two we can learn from The Donald; or at least from his campaign.

Images:
a) Getty Images, Tom Pennington
b) Twitter
c) CNN Money

How to avoid digital dead ends

Have you ever noticed that so-called Ďexpress lanesí on the road or in stores are often slower than the normal lanes?
While I know itís easy to go on auto-pilot when performing mundane chores like driving or shopping, it amazes me that people so often follow the actual signs instead of reading the signs around them.
Because we humans are inherently disengaged, conflicted or uncertain as to what we should do in many situations, weíre attracted to people and things that can give us clarity, focus and direction. This is particularly the case when we donít know a great deal about the subject at hand.
Charismatic leaders understand this. The more effective they are at providing a clear and compelling way forward, the more followers they attract. Not that their chosen path is always a good or rewarding one as history has shown on many occasions.
Digital marketing, as a discipline is failing miserably in giving marketers a clear way forward. Or perhaps itís the other way around.
Itís not for want of trying, however. You could spend all your time consuming books, courses, podcasts, webinars, articles and conferences on digital this, mobile that, programmatic whatever. Itís information overload, the sworn enemy of clarity and focus.
What ends up happening is that huge dollops of dollars are being spent on doing digital stuff with no clear idea as to why itís being done.
I was in a brainstorming session a few years ago with our client and their creative, media and PR agencies. The solutions that were put forward to increase awareness and drive sales of the clientís brand were all based on just doing digital stuff. Letís sponsor Shazam, letís run targeted Facebook ads, letís do cool banner ads, letís do pre-roll YouTube ads etc. Lots and lots of stuff.
My suggestion about first creating a strategy, engaging with consumers via email and phone to better understand their interests and needs and THEN rolling-out select digital stuff was met with a deafening silence. I was obviously a buzz-kill.
Itís no wonder clients end up going down expensive digital dead ends when they consistently receive advice that amount to just doing lots of stuff. The people giving the advice often know just enough jargon to confuse the people (clients) receiving it.
This doesnít have to be you.
Here are the four key questions you need to answer when planning and implementing your digital program IF you want it to deliver actual results beyond views, likes, clicks and opens:

What do you want?
OK, it seems like Iím trying to teach you, an experienced and savvy businessperson how to suck eggs. Sorry. But for this rant to actually resonate with you in the context of all the hot air you may have been fed, I need to boil it down to the basics.
Is your market aging and you need a younger demographic? Are your competitors doing a better job than you of building awareness / relevance in the market? Do your customers buy on price and not much else?
These are the types of grunty sales and marketing problems that you need solutions for. Theyíre exactly the problems you can and should be looking to digital marketing to help you solve.
Marketing strategies and digital marketing strategies are not mutually exclusive. They must be intertwined. You must know what you want to achieve commercially before a coderís keyboard is struck in anger.
If your digital partner doesnít get what youíre looking to achieve outside of what can be done on a computer, mobile phone or a tablet, get a new partner.
What do your customers want?
I know, itís obvious, but why do so many digital programs seem self rather than customer serving? One of the exciting aspects of web marketing is that itís relatively easy to find the customers youíre looking to influence. So thereís no real excuse to be inward or focus group oriented with your digital programs.
The internet is the ultimate home of people seeking answers, solutions and to have most of their needs met. As with all types of marketing, the better we meet those needs the more successful we will be.
Often, the main solution web browsers are looking for is to make a connection with others who are Ďjust like meí. Weíve achieved phenomenal results by simply asking customers to – confidentially – tell us their story as it relates to the product / service weíre marketing. Usually for no incentive other than the satisfaction of being heard.
Billions of dollars of value are being wiped off bottom lines in many industries because of many companiesí failure truly understand what their customers want. The default reaction: cut the price.
Do online surveys using third party lists if you donít have your own; send an email to your customers asking for their opinions; put on a series of wine and cheese chats in your office; do targeted Google / Facebook ad campaigns driving prospects to a survey page. Heck, get on the phone and just talk to a bunch of random customers! Or do all of the above.
Your customers donít care about your new website, app, eDM, social media page. Unless of course those platforms give them something that they want. If you use the access you have to your customers / prospects using various digital means, any or all of these may be appropriate. But you donít really know if you donít ask.

Think Long-Term
Unless you have a here today gone tomorrow offering, your digital vision needs to extend beyond the next six weeks or months. Try six years Ė for starters.
I get that marketers tend to be career butterflies but if you do your job effectively, your brandís customers are not. We all are looking for long-term relationships: with our spouses, friends, work colleagues and of course, brands. Those types of relationships donít happen after a 6 week burst. Thatís a start, but the true value for everyone involved only becomes apparent over the years.
The same applies with your digital programs. Companies who view digital through the prism of the next quarter or yearís results are leaving money on the table.
By all means launch with a bang, get consumers engaged and excited but make sure you have a compelling answer for ďnow what?Ē. If senior management are looking for a ROI directly attributable to your investment in digital after only a few months in most cases, you may have a problem.
Iíve seen many cases of clever short-term digital campaigns with no follow-up strategy. This is old paradigm thinking: run my ad today and watch the sales fly tomorrow. The main advantage with digital vs. traditional advertising is that itís much easier and more cost-effective to create assets Ė e.g. email / mobile databases / social media engagement.
And what can assets do? Provide a return over many years. Your 2016 digital budget should be directly returning money to your organisation in 2021 and beyond.
Stay the course

Donít get bored with your digital campaign. Make adjustments by all means based on customer feedback but resist the urge to try something new when the old way could be working just fine.
Many marketers love shiny new things in the name of keeping up with changing consumer interests and needs. Which has some validity. The problems arise when you keep having to continually start from scratch, rather than build on what you did before.
Like relationships, if itís the right one you hang in there through good and bad times. Customers donít care when your budget starts and finishes; if you disappear for six months, one of your competitors has probably stolen your thunder – and customer.
Invariably, there are countless opportunities in your market for you to launch successful digital programs simply because most companies are not planning and acting in a structured way like this.

Use this formula to steer a course through the maze of digital options. Donít just ask ďwhat are we going to do?Ē WHY youíre going to do it is an infinitely more important question.
When you read and understand the signs that are all around youíll be much more likely to get where you want to go. The alternative is far less appealing.
 
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The Decline and Fall of Free-to-Air TV

Free-to-air (FTA) TV is gone, over, finished, obsolete, outta here. Everyone is on their mobile phones, tablets, PCs etc etc. NO-ONE watches TV anymore, right?
Wrong.
FTA, of course is†not finished. It merely has had a bit of a turn and is†having a lie down. It will be back†bigger than ever, right?
Wrong.
Once the staple evening and weekend fare of every self-respecting baby boomer and Gen X’er, television is no longer our†’electronic hearth’. We have plenty of other glass that we can stare at now. And that glass allows US to be the creative director,†programmer and consumer where, when, what and however we choose. It’s exciting, flexible and fun!
All of which leaves poor old FTA†looking like a threadbare old coat†gathering dust in the corner while the flashier Zegna suit alternatives sashay out the door.
Nothing new here. Technology is being regularly rendered obsolete. Depending on your age, this†list provides a reminder of what was once vital and is now irrelevant (did someone say floppy disk?).
Sure, multi-year sports mega-deals with FTA networks still make news but now there’s this little thing called ‘digital rights’ that sporting franchise owners have carved off. Before you know it, those same sports will be running their own multi-media empires and they won’t need external TV stations anymore. Why? Because they can. They own what viewers want which is why broadcast rights are so valuable. That’s why ‘narrowcast’ rights are even more valuable. The more focused you are, the more valuable you become.
This could not be starker than in network television’s own ecosystem. According to Forbes,†sports focused ESPN is worth $50 billion+ compared to the generalist ABC network’s $3.2 billion valuation.
And then there’s cable, Netflix and Apple TV and Amazon TV. All of which are vertically integrating by creating and controlling their own content through to its eventual distribution and
marketing. And we haven’t even mentioned YouTube.
In a complex, tangled and confusing electronic content dissemination world, FTA television seems firmly stuck where it was king of the heap: the 70’s. Of course, FTA still attracts enormous†audiences but as†with all declining technologies, while the trend is gradual it’s not looking good. What FTA TV will look like in 10 years time is anyone’s guess.
Mourn not though. Globally, television executives have at best paid lip service to the hyper-connectedness facilitated†by digital communications. Throw up a few websites, syndicate our†media releases on a Facebook page and enable SMS voting for our talent shows and we’re sorted. They’re so not sorted.
There are collectively hundreds of millions of viewers out there who have never had any personal interaction with the FTA TV channels they’ve slavishly supported for decades. Some could argue that they never needed to connect with viewers beyond offering them fabulous programs to watch. Which still works. To a degree. Trouble is, we’ve all been spoiled by what we can do and what we can control.
So while it’s unrealistic to think that regular emails and SMS’ to viewers will halt the declining trend, it can’t hurt.
But the clock is ticking, and it’s very loud.
 
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legarde-rob.com

Too Many Brands, Not Enough Money

Shock horror. Major retailer Myer has announced that it’s cutting 100 brands to make way for ‘new’ brands. This follows arch rival David Jones’ earlier decision to also axe 180 brands.
It’s all about rationalisation, freeing up shelf space, offering more mid-market offerings blah, blah, blah. We’ve heard it all before.
Cry not for the brands, however.
Frankly, the decision probably makes sound commercial sense. If the soon to be gone brands aren’t pulling their sales/profit weight they should be deleted. It’s always up to the brand owner to drive sales by ensuring that it’s relevant to its target market.
What these decisions do highlight though is the critical need for brands to take greater control of their distribution channel destiny. Clearly, you can’t trust the accursed retailers with their competing agendas.
As I previously wrote, this could not be more cruelly apparent than with†supermarkets where Coles & Woolworths are doing a brilliant†job of leveraging†the demand created by†their ‘brand partners’ to create their own premium brands.
So where does that leave the poor old brand owner now†shivering out†in the cold?
Go direct and retail intermediaries be damned!
Seek out your customers directly by connecting with them online. Open stores on Amazon and eBay. Build massive opt-in email databases and send regular eDMs focused on customers’ specific needs and interests. Engage your customers†directly.†If you don’t, someone else will and in all likelihood they won’t have your best interests at heart.
Ceding transactional control of your customers to retailers is an old paradigm. It’s not a redundant paradigm, mind you. If you can be listed†in a major retailer, fantastic. Enjoy the ride and make your money.
But as hundreds of brand owners are now finding out, being on the inside with†a retailer is†not something you can or should rely on.
The only loyalty you can count†on is from customers with whom you have a direct relationship. The margins are higher, the control is far greater and, if you do your job well, customer satisfaction will be the best it has ever been.
 
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SOS: Students or Staff?

 
 

The Email Strikes Back

Imagine a time long, long ago: 2002.
Facebook was but a twinkle in Mark Zuckerbergís eye. ĎAppí was nothing more than my nickname. Big data sounded like a Clint Eastwood movie. And digital marketing, well that meant banner ads, websites, My Space profiles and spam emails.
Good times.
Fast forward to today and boy, itís SO much more exciting! Digital technology is infinitely more ingrained in our lives and all manner of platforms, programs and strategies are now available to digital marketers.
Thereís only one problem: those pesky bean counters keep on wanting you to deliver a profit from your investment in digital.
Hate that.
There is good news, however.
If you thought Facebookís 1.4 billion users was impressive, how about another digital platform that has 3.9 billion users. It has a 300% higher conversion rate than social media with sales that have 17% higher value. And hereís the kicker: for every $1 spent on this platform, the average return is $44.25. Thatís a lot of beans to count.
So what is this amazing digital platform? Itís, wait for it, EMAIL!
Email? Are you serious? Email is so, well, old and boring.
Yes, compared to all the latest digital, mobile and social media thingamies, email marketing has whiskers. It hasnít had the digerati WOW factor since the 90ís. And if youíre waiting for an invitation to deliver the keynote at a digital marketing conference dissecting your highly successful email marketing program, donít hold your breath.
For a time there, the figures suggested that email was on the way out. According to the McKinsey iConsumer survey there was a 20% decline in email usage from 2008 to 2012, inversely proportional to the increased popularity of social media, instant messaging and mobile apps.
Given that many marketers have the attention span of a tsetse fly, the endless new digital tools to play with are tailor made. You get your head around Instagram and then along comes Pinterest. You master YouTube and then you have to contend with Periscope (or Meerkat). Heaven!
The key problem that digital technology has created for many marketers is that there are so many new platforms and methods to learn about that the Ďwhat to doí has taken the focus away from the Ďwhy to do ití.
Iíve seen millions of dollars spent on Ďdoing digital stuffí with no clear strategy as to how the activity will lead to increased sales, awareness, new customers or more satisfied existing customers. As for a longer-term vision that builds on the momentum thatís been created by the initial digital campaign, forget about it.
Of course, itís not all doom and gloom. Smart marketers have been focused on building digital assets since the 90ís; starting with opt-in email databases through to active communities on target market appropriate social media platforms.
While the juryís still out on putting all your eggs in the social media basket, there has been a clear resurgence in email marketingís appeal.
Salesforce Marketing Cloudís 2015 State of Marketing report found that for 73% of marketers email is core to their business. Tellingly, 60% see email as a critical Ďenablerí of their products and services this year compared to 42% in 2014.
Even though there hasnít been anything new to get excited about with email since Adam was fretting over the Y2K virus, the savvy among us know that if itís results youíre after email marketing is what you should be doing.
Not that the humble email in and of itself is anything special. As with any type of marketing, the magic is not in the technology or the delivery method, it lies in the ability of that marketing initiative to take the target market from point A to point B.
As youíve no doubt experienced, in the hands of amateurs and villains, email has the power to damage and dilute a brand. How many deathly dull email newsletters have you received that talk all about the sender and nothing that’s remotely interesting to you?
And then thereís spam.
It could be argued Ė convincingly Ė that any commercial email that doesnít focus on what your market is interested in and what can help them is spam.
So be warned. You donít have to be selling dodgy medical cures or timeshare apartments for recipients to hate you for wasting their time and clogging up their inbox.
Conversely, effectively crafted email marketing is still what it has always been: an incredibly flexible, highly targeted, trackable and results-generating strategy.
Hereís a fun exercise: compare the cost per personal contact for email versus any other sales or marketing method. We did this recently for a clientís Business-2-Business email marketing campaign and compared it to their salespeople calling on the same number of customers who opened the email. There was around a $275,000 difference in favour of the humble email. Itís enough to give those bean counters palpitations.
By all means do the fun digital stuff; it may not achieve terribly much but it sure as heck can look good on your CV.
However, if youíre the person responsible for generating leads, driving sales and serving your customers more effectively, email marketing could well be the solution, digital or otherwise, that you need.
 
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Email Marketing

 
 

When to Go All in Online

I’ve had an interesting experience this week. Someone I had never heard of or met proactively contacted me and wanted to connect on LinkedIn. And via email.
And on Skype.
And on Facebook.
Kudos for a shock and awe approach to connect with a prospect. It didn’t work though. I didn’t accept any of her invitations no matter how impressive her persistence and cyber-stalking skills were.
As someone who also proactively contacts people with whom I’d like to do business I have great respect for her energy and application. It’s just her judgement and of course her offering that caused me to not engage with her.
While I had obviously been vetted by the business I run – I assume my dashing good looks didn’t figure too highly as a selection criterion – her ‘try every digital touch point in one hit’ left me cold.
This is what I wrote about in my book Customer Romance (www.customerromance.com). We customers need to wooed before we’re won. Heck, we may not even be right for you or vice versa. But if you show me that I matter and that you want to get to know†my needs, fears, wants and desires and then MAYBE we can take it to the next level.
Try liking my last LinkedIn Pulse article, or leave a comment. Take a position on one of our†articles†on our Google+†page. Re-tweet what we tweeted an hour ago.
Take an†authentic†interest in me and what I’m doing and the law of reciprocity†may kick in.
It’s a lot of work isn’t it. And ultimately, it may all be for nothing as I may STILL not be interested in what you’re selling.
But that’s what it takes to form a relationship personally or professionally. Nothing is ever guaranteed. What IS guaranteed however is that if you go too far too soon you’ll invariably be rebuffed and then there’s no way back.
One of my favourite digital marketing sayings†is ‘just because you can doesn’t mean you should’. Yes, I’m on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter and Skype but trying to connect with†me on most of these over the course of 12 or so hours when I’ve never heard of you is a little much.
Perhaps it my Australian reserve coming out but without getting to know me you probably didn’t know I’d feel that way.
Now before you suggest that I get over it, having empathy and understanding as to how your beautifully crafted†sales and marketing initiatives†will be received by your target market is critical to your success or otherwise.
If you want your audiences to be receptive rather than resentful, get up from behind your desk, walk a mile in their shoes and try to genuinely look at what you’re doing from THEIR point of view.
It’s marketing 101 but it’s not easy. You’re infinitely more aware of what you need rather than what they need. But that’s why we’re called sales and marketing professionals. We have the†judgement to know when to hold and we know when to fold (thank you Kenny Rogers).
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes Ė providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Image courtesy of: goodenough.asia

Your Media Empire

It was a match made in heaven.
The media created content to attract audiences and (primarily) marketing budgets. Marketers, needing a place and a way to disseminate their promotional messages were insatiably drawn to the media because of those audiences.
From print to radio and on to television the symbiotic relationship was simple and elegant and it worked for decades.
But then along came the internet, combined with digital technology and the unexpected happened. Readers, viewers and listeners had somewhere else to go.
At home and on the go there were almost limitless places to get a daily media fix. Add in the ability to run oneís personal life via social media and the previously cosy status quo was gone, never to return.
The impact of the digital age on traditional media empires has been exhaustively documented. Newspapers folding, old media buying new media (whatever you do, donít mention Myspace to Rupert Murdoch) and, worst of all, audiences fragmenting across countless sites, blogs, online games and apps.
So where does that leave marketers still needing to get the word out?
Well, for a time it was all very confusing. Should we do banner ads or Google ads, Facebook ads, build a website, launch a social media program, create an app and write content orÖorÖ? The options and the decisions to make were even more confusing.
Itís not to say that any or all of these options are not worth doing. The big question is where to start.
You start at the end.
Focus on where you want to end up. Thatís when you feel that youíre as set as you once were with your nice, easy to understand media plan leveraging someone elseís audiences.
Today, being set as a marketer means being master of your own media destiny. Sure, other peopleís audiences still help but now thereís an even better way to reach and influence people: create your own audience.
This is not just an option; your future success relies on it. I know this may sound like an absurd, overblown and completely unrealistic idea.
Itís anything but. By cultivating your customers and prospects and leveraging every touch point with them, before you know it youíll have your own mini (or maxi depending on the size of your organisation and your commitment to stay the course) media empire.
Keep them informed, engaged and amused and your audience will at the very least listen to what you have to say when you want to promote your products or services. Yes, being a media proprietor may be out of your comfort zone but consider it this way: itís your core business now.
Digital is where your customers are and digital communications, for most of us, is what our customers are doing every day, hour and minute. So using digital to serve and sell your customers should be central to what you do, no matter what that is.
And hereís the golden nugget: most organisations donít get it. Sure, they may be tinkering around the edges with digital marketing, heck they may even have an eager beaver Digital Marketing Manager or a hip, happening digital agency. There are plenty of people to tell you what to do but not enough to tell you why youíre doing it.
In a sea of digital implementations, an integrated strategic backbone to everything you do gives you the best chance of a) standing out and b) succeeding. And the best way to achieve a) and b) is to build a database of people who hungrily want what youíre selling.
Whatís the best way to build a database? Do what the old time media proprietors did: give audiences†reasons to keep showing up.
Nirvana? Yes. Easy? No. Possible? Yes.
 
The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes Ė providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.
Images: www.inkace.com; bendalls.com.au; bizweb2000.com