Tick Yes Blog
Tick Yes Blog > Content Marketing > The hardest word?

The hardest word?

Saying sorry for something written, posted, tweeted or even said is commonplace in content marketing. But is there something to be said for sticking to your guns?

Saying sorry for something written, posted, tweeted or even said is commonplace in content marketing. But is there something to be said for sticking to your guns?

We were going to start this article ‘In the world of content marketing…’, but then realised that since so many people’s lives – and so much of those lives – are expressed online through content, the situation we’re going to talk about is not, in fact, exclusive to the world of content marketing.

So…

In our everyday, online, personal and professional lives, we often second-guess what we do and don’t share (some of us not frequently enough) in the public forum. This is especially important if you’re sharing content in a professional context, or if the platform you’re using to share it has restrictions about what you can post.

If and when we’re pulled up on said content and perhaps discover we’ve offended someone, most of us are quick to retract the offending piece of digital data, be it an article, a photo or a video – especially if it was posted in a professional context.

But are we too quick to remove offending content in order to keep the peace? What if we believe in the integrity or importance of the content – should we cave to the wishes of one person’s opinion and risk blending into mediocrity as opposed to standing out?

Monster Children, a magazine with bases in Australia and the US, posted a photo on its Facebook page of an image taken by artist Martynka Wawrzyniak. Someone complained to Facebook. Facebook made Monster Children remove the content. Editor in Chief Jason Crombie had something to say about it. Something explicit. Click here to read his ‘Open letter to the person who had me blocked from Facebook for posting a photo by artist Martynka Wawrzyniak.

Should more online content creators and curators stand by what they post, even if it risks offending or – shock horror – damaging sales? Should we all post open invitations to our critics to ‘come forward so I can stomp you into the ground you worthless, cowardly insipid piece of shit’?

OK, so perhaps the threat of violence was unnecessary, but there’s something to be said for an editor standing up for his content rather than playing to the masses. (For the record, Crombie ‘apologised’ – sort of – the next day, but still displayed the courage of his convictions to stand by the essence of his original statement.)

We’d love to hear your thoughts on this one…

 

The Message is brought to you by Tick Yes – providing solutions for all your digital and content marketing needs.

 

 

Tick Yes Tweets

Archives